Menu
VIEW OUR STORY

Media Highlights

New

You know who’s doing their all to fight gun violence in America? Moms

These motivated parents lobbied lawmakers to keep guns out of schools in West Virginia, California, Kentucky, and North Dakota while also passing legislation to keep guns off college campuses in various states. And they’ve made it harder for criminals and domestic abusers to access firearms. Following the tragedy at Sandy Hook where 40 parents lost children in a mass shooting, moms across the country said “no more” and founded Moms Demand Action. The grassroots movement is part of the nonprofit Everytown for Gun Safety, the largest gun violence prevention organization in the U.S. with four million supporters. It’s easy to feel powerless, but these moms remind us that we can fight back bit by bit, state by state — to create a safer America.

Clad in pink and vowing to vote, activists around the globe flood streets for another Women’s March

Saturday’s march made clear how a movement that began as a protest has evolved. A year of the Trump presidency, coupled with the galvanizing experience of the #MeToo moment, has made activists eager to leave a mark on the country’s political system. As a result, a key component of Saturday’s demonstrations was an effort to harness the enthusiasm behind the Women’s March and translate that into political sway at the polls this fall. “Last year it was about hope. This year it’s about strength,” said Diane Costello, 67, a retired teacher and member of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, a group that advocates for gun violence prevention, said as she marched through Manhattan.

Facing congressional inaction, states move to ban bump stocks

Groups such as Giffords and Everytown for Gun Safety are increasingly focusing on states when it comes to gun-control measures. John Feinblatt, president of Everytown, said he believes gun-related issues such as bump stocks are less politically charged at the state level. But pro-gun groups steadfastly oppose such legislation and believe some of the new state laws might be challenged in court.

Press Releases