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South Carolina Moms Applaud Governor Haley for Signing Life-Saving Domestic Violence Bill into Law

COLUMBIA, S.C. – The South Carolina chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America today applauded Governor Haley for signing Senate Bill 3 into law. The law will protect victims of domestic violence by prohibiting abusers convicted of serious domestic violence from possessing guns.

STATEMENT FROM SYLVIE DESSAU, VOLUNTEER CHAPTER LEADER FOR THE SOUTH CAROLINA CHAPTER OF MOMS DEMAND ACTION:

“Today marks an important step forward for South Carolina as our elected leaders have come together to take action to protect victims of domestic violence across the state. This new law will help protect some of our state’s most vulnerable by keeping guns out of the hands of their abusers. I applaud the legislature and Governor Haley for their leadership on this issue, and we look forward to continuing to work with our elected leaders to extend these safeguards to all of South Carolina’s domestic violence victims in the future.”

The South Carolina chapter of Moms Demand Action was part of a large coalition that brought together domestic violence survivors and prevention advocates from across the state to advocate for the passage of a strong domestic violence prevention bill.

Members of the “Safer SC” coalition made thousands of calls to legislators, collected hundreds of postcards from supporters, attended hearings and votes, and submitted letters-to-the-editor and op-eds in support of passing a strong domestic violence prevention bill. In April, more than 50 gun violence prevention advocates gathered in the State House to speak out in support of S.3 and to meet with legislators.

Additional Information About Domestic Violence and S.3:


  • S. 3 will help protect victims of domestic violence by keeping guns out of the hands of their abusers. The new law prohibits abusers who are convicted of domestic violence felonies from having guns and also prohibits domestic abusers from having guns for a period of three years if they are convicted of a domestic violence misdemeanor for causing serious injury to a family member.
  • Between 2007 and 2011, women in South Carolina were twice as likely to be shot and killed by their intimate partners as the average American woman, and the rate is increasing.
  • Research shows the presence of a firearm in a domestic violence situation makes it five times more likely that a woman will be shot and killed.